Join Us For An Insider’s Tour Of Changing Wayne Junction

 

Join us on Friday, October 12 at 3PM as as we explore the Victorian cityscape of the new Wayne Junction National Industrial Historical District in Germantown.

Tour one of Philadelphia’s last working textile mills.

Take a look inside the soon-to-be renovated Max Levy Autograph building.

Get the story behind the ongoing renovation of the Frank Furness-designed Wayne Junction train station. 

Tickets are limited…and discounted for Hidden City members. Members must login HERE to receive the discount. To become a member, click HERE.

In addition to the in depth visits to the station, Wayne Mills, and Max Levy, we’ll take a walk and explore the rest of the newly-designated National Industrial Historic District at Wayne Junction, including Moore Push Pin, Blaisdell Paper Pencil, Arguto Oilless Bearing and Brown Instrument. Learn how the buildings of the historic district are being reused–and how one, the former Van Straatten & Havey silk mill–is soon to be lost to demolition.

Hidden City Daily editor Nathaniel Popkin will lead the tour. Wayne Junction station architect Ignatius Wang will talk to us about the renovation of the station. Developer Ken Weinstein will show us around Max Levy and tell us about his plans for the property.

The Details

Meets at the Suburban Station ticket office at 2:30PM and we’ll travel together to the site on the 2:47 train. Or meet us on the inbound platform of the Wayne Junction train station at 3PM.

$30 for non-members, $20 for members. This does not include the Regional Rail ticket.

Tour will conclude at 5PM, with trains available for the return to Center City.

For additional information, e-mail: editor@hiddencityphila.org.


5 Comments


  1. Great event. Just a small note, the current Wayne Junction station was rebuilt in 1901 to a design by the Wilson Brothers. The previous station from 1881 was the Furness station.

  2. This will be my first time coming along on one of these outings, I am quite excited. Is photography allowed, might be a dumb question?

  3. Since it is sold out, any chance of scheduling a second tour?

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