Find The (Most) Signs, Win A Prize!

October 26, 2012 |  by  |  Last Light  |  ,

 

A $25 “Curious” Hidden City Philadelphia membership to the person who names the locations of the most signs. We’d rather have answers that give the general vicinity–South Broad Street around Oregon Avenue, say–than exact addresses that come from Google. The last two signs no longer exist, but they are real beauties that only got taken down in the last five years, so we thought we’d throw them in. These aren’t easy, so send in your answers to editor@hiddencityphila.org, even if you only know a few.

11th and Sansom

56th and Lancaster

Master and Lee

Germantown and Lehigh

North Broad between Rockland and Ruscomb

Worth and Kinsey

Norris and Sepviva

Fitzwater between 11th and 12th

21st and Market

22nd and Cecil B. Moore

Trenton and Sergeant

5th and Girard

29th and Jefferson

Poplar and Watts


1 Comment


  1. Here is another Center City landmark old sign, currently on eBay…

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=170934447459

    Pauline’s is on Sansom at 10th, the other end of the block where the above linked sign on eBay stood for decades.

    Georgia Boy is on Lancaster, just before you get to Overbrook High.

    Bell’s Auto is on Wallace at Ridge, across from the Laborer’s Union and around the corner from the new Calderwood Gallery (worth a visit!)

    The BAR sign on Silk City I clipped off a building slated for demo, 12th above Market, standing on a U-Haul at lunch hour with a big old bolt cutter.

    Our other Bulova Watch sign came down off the 4400 block of Lancaster and graced the wall of my garage for 15 years before going to a sign museum in Michigan.

    I begged and pleaded for ages for the last Horn & Hardart sign still hanging, which was on City Avenue, but they ignored me and scrapped it. Same with the Log Cabin Inn sign on Baltimore Pike at Route 352.

    Lots of great signs were salvaged years ago by me and several loony rivals, usually with just determined persistence and sometimes a greased palm at the finish line.

Trackbacks

  1. Sandy by the hour | Bart’s ‘anti-casino’ | Toll, Society Hill neighbors at ZBA | cheering land bank legislation | Philly’s brightest bulbs | ID old signs
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