At Broad & Arch, Views From A Still Forgotten Tower

 

Liberty Title & Trust building | Photo: Hidden City Daily

Taken during demolition of Broad Street Station. Phialdelphia Historical Commission, 1953 | Photo: Lawrence Williams

Photo: James Dillon Collection, Athenaeum of Philadelphia

 

The 1929 Liberty Title & Trust Building at Broad and Arch Streets, the only existing building on the block to survive the expansion of the Pennsylvania Convention Center, remains empty a full year and a half after the enlarged facility opened.

The offices have been vacant since the Philadelphia Water Department moved out in the late 1990s. Until recently, a Dunkin Donuts occupied the street level corner, but it has closed.

The building, designed by the firm Savery & Scheetz, is owned by Realen Properties, who purchased it in 2008. Realen is the developer of the parking garage and retail project designed by Erdy McHenry Architecture being presently completed across Arch Street.

According to its website and previous media reports, Realen plans to convert the office building into a 150 room hotel. But multiple calls to the Berwyn-based real estate development firm seeking an update of the plans went unreturned.

The developer has recently tightened building security, after a spate of break-ins.


3 Comments


  1. Here are some photos of the vault and of the rooftop at night.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/phillyurbex/sets/72157631680613856/

  2. Thanks for that link! I took some shots of the vault but they all came out horrible….

  3. No problem! I’ve tried to do some research on this location myself. Everything i get keeps referring me back to the wachovia bank building. The building was owned by the Fidelity-Philadelphia Trust Co. Which if you consult Wikipedia will tell you the company was a result of a merger in 1928. However, everything I find refers to the wachovia building. I know the trust owned a couple of buildings in the area. I believe that this tower was originally one of two towers. One of which was destroyed by the convention center expansion. Is it possible thst this building was the trust building that wikipedia says is the wachovia building? Check out the company name on the documents from the vault. http://www.flickr.com/x/t/0092009/photos/phillyurbex/8070780293/

Trackbacks

  1. Philadelphia 2035 - Page 78 - City-Data Forum

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
Shaping A New Urban Crossroads At 33rd And Chestnut

Shaping A New Urban Crossroads At 33rd And Chestnut

January 18, 2017  |  Vantage

Contributor Ann de Forest stands at the confluence of Penn and Drexel's campuses where a once listless intersection is being redefined with energy, connectivity, and strategic design > more

The Best Seats In The City, Ban Be Damned

The Best Seats In The City, Ban Be Damned

January 16, 2017  |  Buzz

Last week Friends of Rittenhouse Square and PPR announced a ban from sitting on the interior walls of the park. Two days later Mayor Jim Kenney reversed the rule. We take a look at life along the balustrades in these old photos > more

Capturing The Ghosts Of Demolition

Capturing The Ghosts Of Demolition

January 13, 2017  |  Last Light

The demolition composites of photographer Andrew Evans beguile the eye with ghostly images of a city passing through time. Evans presents his newest additions to the series and explains his process with this photo essay > more

Pencoyd Bridge Reopens In Manayunk, As Redevelopment Of Foundry Site Begins

Pencoyd Bridge Reopens In Manayunk, As Redevelopment Of Foundry Site Begins

January 11, 2017  |  Vantage

The deserted industrial site of Pencoyd Iron Works is next on a growing list of riverside redevelopment along the Schuylkill. Contributor Mick Ricereto takes us deep inside the history of the family-owned foundry and farmland that dates back to the city's founding > more

Urban Fantasy: The Carousel Maker Of Broad & Erie

Urban Fantasy: The Carousel Maker Of Broad & Erie

January 10, 2017  |  The Shadow Knows

Traditional carousel design may have roots in Europe, but "Philadelphia Style" took the amusement ride to a whole new level. The Shadow takes a stroll down Germantown Avenue where the G.A. Dentzel Carousel Company became the gold standard in animal kingdom merry-go-rounds > more

Lost Buildings Of 2016

Lost Buildings Of 2016

December 30, 2016  |  Vantage

That cheery, time-honored tradition: the year-end list. Here on the Daily, that means a roundup of the year's demolitions in our World Heritage City. Brad Maule finds 2016's list warrants more than just a top ten > more