Progress At 19th Street Baptist

 

Photo: Sean Maxwell

Last Saturday, April 28th, the masonry materials supply company LimeWorks.us, which markets an environmentally benign hydraulic lime mortar to be used in place of Portland cement, led a small workshop with some volunteers at the 19th Street Baptist Church in South Philadelphia in an effort to stabilize a section of the church’s compromised north wall. The volunteer team was made up of church members, a masonry student from Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology, and the student’s father.

Photo: Sean Maxwell

Photo: Sean Maxwell

Photo: Sean Maxwell

After raking the joints and cleaning the area, the crew replaced the bedding mortar using the company’s Ecologic Mortar, which is made up of natural hydraulic lime. The mortar is meant to be an accurate reflection of the building’s original mortar.

According to Sean Maxwell of LimeWorks.us, the team successfully repaired two sections of the failing mortar on the north facing wall of the serpentine stone church. Maxwell says the company donated all the materials for the workshop and left a few bags for Reverend Vince Smith and his team of trained volunteers to continue making the most urgently needed repair.

“Following the workshop it became quite obvious that a master plan is needed to fully address all the repair needs inside and out,” says Maxwell.

About the author

Hidden City co-editor Nathaniel Popkin’s latest book is the novel Lion and Leopard (The Head and The Hand Press). He is also the author of Song of the City (Four Walls Eight Windows/Basic Books) and The Possible City (Camino Books). He is also senior writer and script editor of the Emmy-winning documentary series “Philadelphia: The Great Experiment” and the fiction review editor of Cleaver Magazine.



2 Comments


  1. I say ‘canonize’ these gents. At least it’s something positive. Frank Furness
    is smiling!

  2. Really great news!

Trackbacks

  1. Yes We Can Save The Frank Furness 19th Street Baptist Church
Recent Posts
Lost & Found (And Lost Again)

Lost & Found (And Lost Again)

July 28, 2014  |  Vantage

Keep a close eye on construction sites and you sometimes see a hidden layer of history come to light. Peter Woodall has been saving up good examples for a while now and brings us this collection > more

NoLibs Zoning Chair Discusses How Best To Ensure Density

NoLibs Zoning Chair Discusses How Best To Ensure Density

July 28, 2014  |  Morning Blend

Larry Freedman on the necessity of “sincere and informed” discussions with developers, Ken Weinstein offers to facilitate inclusion of Germantown Ave trestle in regional trail network, St. Joseph’s to get state historical marker, and readying for the Civic Design Review of the Morman Church’s apartment complex proposal > more

A Call For Open Parking Data And The Better Planning It Allows

A Call For Open Parking Data And The Better Planning It Allows

July 25, 2014  |  Morning Blend

Why we can’t ignore the parking problem any longer, developer to talk loft conversion in South Philly, more student housing in UCity, videographer chronicles Philly’s “Makers,” and all taxis to get cameras > more

A Place Called The Plateau Is Where Everybody Goes

A Place Called The Plateau Is Where Everybody Goes

July 24, 2014  |  Last Light

With yesterday's dedication of the John K. Binswanger Grove of Park Champions, the Fairmount Park Conservancy ushered in a new era of growth at the Belmont Plateau. It's always been Brad Maule's favorite place to survey the growth of the Philly skyline > more

Plan To Revitalize Kensington North Of Lehigh Approved

Plan To Revitalize Kensington North Of Lehigh Approved

July 24, 2014  |  Morning Blend

Planning Commission likes what it sees from New Kensington CDC, Philadelphia’s building boom as complimentary across varying sectors, renovating affordable commercial properties in North Philly, and INHP and the economic multiplier effect > more

Landmarks, Reinterpreted

Landmarks, Reinterpreted

July 24, 2014  |  Buzz

To help celebrate its 200th anniversary, the Athenaeum asked artists to reinterpret architectural landmark's on the National Register of Historic Places. The exhibition of the work is on display until August 8 > more