The Atwater Kent Reopens

newsworks.com

  • NewsWorks reports on the re-branding and reopening of the 7th Street’s Atwater Kent Museum, now the Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent. Executive Director Charles Croce explains that the goal in the collection’s reorganization was to contemporize their holdings, which now runs the gamut from the Revolutionary to John Street. “Unnecessary” objects, like the Charles Willson Peale 1819 portrait of Muslim freeman Yarrow Mamout were sold off in order to raise funds for renovations.
  • The Inquirer reports that President Obama’s budget has reserved some $31 million for the deepening of the Delaware by an additional five feet. PA Senators Casey and Toomey are on board, while environmentalists remain steadfast in their condemnation of the plan that could wreck the estuary. The article notes however, that placement on a Presidential budget plan usually ensures a measure’s eventual realization.
  • Libertarian author and pundit Charles Murray, whose infamous 1994 book The Bell Curve reintroduced class-based racialism to popular debate, has just published a new book (Coming Apart: The State of America, 1960—2010) which finds America’s economic scapegoat in Fishtown, Philadelphia. For Murray, this working class, usually white neighborhood is little more than an amalgam of welfare queens. Joel Mathis of the Philly Post expands on what he sees as an oversimplification.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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