Owner Of Historic Church Slammed For Lack Of Effort & Imagination In Its Sale

Church of the Assumption | Photo: Peter Woodall

  • According to Plan Philly, the Board of License and Inspection Review feels that the social service agency Siloam failed to adequately attempt to sell its historic property of the Church of the Assumption, at 11th & Spring Garden. As such, the Historical Commission erred in granting the permission for demolition based on financial hardship concerns. Of course, this speaks of a larger issue. Here in Philadelphia, there has been some adaptive reuse of church buildings, but not nearly enough.  As Michael Greenle writes in this morning’s Inquirer (in the context of shuttered schools, while citing the Church of the Assumption): “These structures are the bones of a vibrant city, a necessity as Philadelphia struggles to maintain a fabric that makes it attractive to newcomers and different from the suburban-style cities it competes with for talent.”
  • The Atlantic Cities looks at the misleading art and science behind wayfinding, or “environmental graphic design.” Clearly more than hanging maps, it is about appreciating natural rhythms while remaining comprehensive. “Walk! Philadelphia” signage was one of the first of its kind, starting in 1995. Now, as one comment admits, it remains the “gold standard.”
  • This morning, state legislators and SEPTA representatives to discuss a path forward to improve Holmesburg Junction, reports NEast Philly. Residents wish “to see parking, landscaping and infrastructure improvements at the station” as part of the collaborative effort between the Upper Holmesburg Civic Association and the Planning Commission’s 2035 plan.
  • Philadelphia Neighborhoods visits Hunting Park, where the “lost addresses” of an undetermined number of abandoned homes continue to haunt the community.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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