Is A Neighborhood Improvement District A Good Idea For North Central Philly?

North Philadelphia blight

  • In a Philadelphia Weekly opinion piece, Matthew Petrillo asks: “Does a Neighborhood Improvement District Tax Make Sense for an Area That can’t Afford It?” The context here is Council President Darrell Clarke’s plan for the North Central NID (Broad to 19th & York to Girard), which calls for a 7% increase in the area’s real estate taxes for the sake of public safety and the erasing of blight. “But in an area in which 42 percent of property owners owe hundreds of thousands of dollars of property taxes, some see Clarke’s proposal as a burden to the already struggling neighborhood.”
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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4 Comments


  1. The article on the North Central NID is ridiculous. The only people that are going to be paying more are the landlords. People that live there will not pay an extra cent and will benefit from the extra cleaning and security for free. Whatever reason that woman has to object to the NID is probably not rational.

  2. The article could have done more investigation into Vivian Vanstory. The charitable status of her organization, Community Land Trust, was revoked by the IRS several years ago. In addition, a Court found in 2002 that she had forged a relative’s will.

  3. It definitely sounds like Clarke’s empowering some probable campaign contributors with this one. Which is a shame, cause the idea of a group of people getting together to make ANY neighborhood better in Philly is amazing. It just sucks this one seems to sleazy.

  4. The law requires Darrell Clarke to sit on the board of the NID and have have his hand in the cash drawer. The people of Callowhill defeated the imposition of yet another property tax increase on them in the form of a NID. Get organized and be strong because any resistance to a tax increase in Philly will cause the progressives to attack without mercy.

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