So Long, Snow White

January 13, 2012 |  by  |  Buzz  |  , , ,

Former Snow White diner | Photo: Peter Woodall

There are few places as democratic as a greasy spoon, and the Snow White diner on 19th and Chestnut was no exception. Its short order cooks were on a first name basis with businessmen, students and panhandlers alike until last week, when it closed to little fanfare. The luncheonette had plenty of fans nonetheless, including Inquirer food critic Craig Laban, who thought its burger was one of the best around.

The Snow White’s demise is the latest in a series of Center City diner closings, and while it may be a tad premature to call the diner an endangered species in Center City, changing tastes and demographics are certainly thinning the herd. The other Snow White diner, on 2nd and Market, closed last year and turned into Revolution House, a microbrew and pizza joint. Meanwhile, the Midtown diner empire has been reduced to numbers II and III on 11th and 18th Streets. respectively, with the Midtown IV now Stephen Starr’s El Rey and Ranstead Room. The gussied- up hamburger craze shows no signs of abating, though–the Snow White is being replaced by a Burger.org offering 100 percent organic beef.

 

 

 

Peter Woodall is the co-editor of Hidden City Daily. He is a graduate of the UC Berkeley School of Journalism, and a former newspaper reporter with the Biloxi Sun Herald and the Sacramento Bee. He worked as a producer for Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane and wrote a column about neighborhood bars for PhiladelphiaWeekly.com.



2 Comments


  1. Why is it called Burger.org?
    Their domain name is http://burgerorg.net/
    It doesn’t make sense.

Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

 

Recent Posts
The Best Seats In The City, Ban Be Damned

The Best Seats In The City, Ban Be Damned

January 16, 2017  |  Buzz

Last week Friends of Rittenhouse Square and the Department of Parks and Recreation announced a ban from sitting on the interior walls of Rittenhouse Square, the city's prized public living room. Two days later Mayor Jim Kenney reversed the rule, protecting a decades-old tradition. We take a look at life along the balustrades in these old photos > more

Capturing The Ghosts Of Demolition

Capturing The Ghosts Of Demolition

January 13, 2017  |  Last Light

The demolition composites of photographer Andrew Evans beguile the eye with ghostly images of a city passing through time. Evans presents his newest additions to the series and explains his process with this photo essay > more

Pencoyd Bridge Reopens In Manayunk, As Redevelopment Of Foundry Site Begins

Pencoyd Bridge Reopens In Manayunk, As Redevelopment Of Foundry Site Begins

January 11, 2017  |  Vantage

The deserted industrial site of Pencoyd Iron Works is next on a growing list of riverside redevelopment along the Schuylkill. Contributor Mick Ricereto takes us deep inside the history of the family-owned foundry and farmland that dates back to the city's founding > more

Urban Fantasy: The Carousel Maker Of Broad & Erie

Urban Fantasy: The Carousel Maker Of Broad & Erie

January 10, 2017  |  The Shadow Knows

Traditional carousel design may have roots in Europe, but "Philadelphia Style" took the amusement ride to a whole new level. The Shadow takes a stroll down Germantown Avenue where the G.A. Dentzel Carousel Company became the gold standard in animal kingdom merry-go-rounds > more

Lost Buildings Of 2016

Lost Buildings Of 2016

December 30, 2016  |  Vantage

That cheery, time-honored tradition: the year-end list. Here on the Daily, that means a roundup of the year's demolitions in our World Heritage City. Brad Maule finds 2016's list warrants more than just a top ten > more

Unlisted Philadelphia: John Decker & Son

Unlisted Philadelphia: John Decker & Son

December 28, 2016  |  Vantage

Ben Leech spotlights unique and significant buildings not listed on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places with his architectural illustration series, Unlisted Philadelphia. With this installment, a kingly cornice in Brewerytown > more