Photographer’s Work Tells Of “Changing Neighborhoods”

philly.com

  • The Inquirer reports on photographer Zoe Strauss’s retrospective exhibit at the Art Museum — opening this Saturday and running through April 22. And the PMA is promoting the work by featuring select photographs on 50 billboards across the city. Stauss’ “work is also about its surroundings.”  The portraits “reflect and inform the surrounding neighborhood, not always thought of as the most welcoming.”
  • Flying Kite tours Nicetown’s Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center on Wissahickon Avenue. Opening in November 2010, the $72 million, 130,000 square-foot community center provides North Philadelphia with a pool and other fitness facilities, a daycare, and an early childhood education center. Education Director Alyson Goodner comments on how the community center evolves, fluidly responding to the needs and whims of its members.
  • Local activists, including the Avenging the Ancestors Coalition (ATAC), are pushing for the recognition of space at Germantown’s West Queen Lane and Pulaski Avenue as hollowed ground, being as an African American cemetery was created here before the Revolutionary War. It’s an important place “because it ends the disconnect and begins the connect, says ATAC’s Michael Coard. “It’s a step backward going forward.”
  • Grid Magazine invites you to a screening of The Economics of Happiness, a film that discusses “the benefits of localization and the perils of globalization.” This Thursday night, at Center City’s Trinity Memorial Church, from 5:30 to 7:30.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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