Furness’s Mt. Airy Station

Mt Airy train station

Photo: Mike Szilagyi

On Sunday, neighbors of the Mt. Airy train station, at Gowen Avenue and Devon Street, turned out as they do every year to decorate the station. The building was designed by Frank Furness in 1882, the same year his Undine boathouse opened on Boat House Row.

The station houses a SEPTA ticket office and waiting room, as well as the 80,000 book inventory of Walk a Crooked Mile Books. The used book store, an integral part of the neighborhood for fifteen years, will host an open house this Friday night December 2. Greg Williams, the bookstore’s owner, tells us, “we’ll have a fire outside, the makings for s’mores, other food and drink, a chance to shop both outside and inside until 9 p.m. and live music by one of our favorite singer songwriters, Sharon Abbott.”


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About the author

Mike Szilagyi was born in the Logan neighborhood of Philadelphia, and raised in both Logan and what was the far edge of suburbia near Valley Forge. He found himself deeply intrigued by both the built landscape and by the natural “lay of the land.” Where things really get interesting is the fluid, intricate, multi-layered interface between the two.

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2 Comments


  1. Franklin Gowen hired Furness for the P&R and personally. He lived nearby and this was his station. It shows. Though, the Gowen in Gowen Avenue was his father, James.

  2. Thanks, Mike – great information

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