Fox Chase And Temple Health To Merge

Photo: EDA Contractors

  • The Inquirer reports on yesterday’s announcement that Fox Chase Cancer Center we be integrated into the Temple Health System. This “win, win, win” solution—as the Temple system’s president and CEO Larry Kaiser described for the deal for patients and both institutions—would shift Fox Chase’s debt to the North Philadelphia based system, which would in turn transform its cancer program from “nothing to world-class in 60 seconds.”
  • If Finnigan’s Wake, the Northern Liberties Irish pub row at 3rd & Spring Garden streets, wants to erase its side alley (North Bodine Street) from the grid in order to erect balconies on that side, it will have to deal with the next City Council, reports Plan Philly. Once again, questions have been raised concerning outgoing Councilman Frank DiCicco selective support for such private circumnavigation of municipal reality, with most agreeing “it at least had the appearance of a special favor.”
  • Philly LIVE! is no more, replaced by the Comcast branded XFINITY LIVE! entertainment and restaurant district. Expect much in the way of (Comcast owned) NBC sports coverage and cheesesteaks galore in the phased development project, supposedly ready as early as April of the coming year.
  • Update: The Callowhill Reading Viaduct Neighborhood Improvement District has indeed been created by the City Council, regardless of the reported 51.9% of property owners who voted no. A last legislative effort by the outgoing Council, the approval will rest on if there were any “irregularities” in the vote.
About the author

Stephen Currall recently received his BA in history from Arcadia University. Before beginning doctoral studies, he is pursuing his interest in local history, specifically just how Philadelphians engage their vibrant past. Besides skimming through 18th century letters, Steve is also interested in music and travel.

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