Land Of Expectations

Jules Feiffer’s famous cover

“My, my, my, my, my, welcome, welcome, welcome, welcome to the land of Expectations, to the land of Expectations, to the land of Expectations,” says the Whether Man in Norton Juster’s 1961 classic, and my favorite book as a kid, Phantom Tollbooth. Juster, a Penn-trained architect, knows a thing or two about Philadelphia, so long a place of expectations, expectations, expectations…and perhaps not so often met. (A few months before Juster took his degree in architecture, Mayor Joseph Clark initiated the demolition of Broad Street Station to make way for Penn Center, whose plazas today still defy those expectations.)

Juster returns Saturday to be interviewed by noted artist and children’s book author Alexander Stadler (Beverly Billingsly, Julian Rodriguez) at the Central Branch of the Free Library. It’s interesting timing, for despite the relentlessly grim economy, our urban expectations are growing.

Why? My sense is that it’s a result of a recent push for planning and civic engagement. After a good two decades or more of purely reactionary public policy, meant only to avert disaster, we’re planning. And planning means imagining, planning means creating, planning means playing out the conceit that we can shape the future.

Well then, welcome to the land of expectations, expectations, expectations. (Truth is, there is so much planning going on–from city district plans to campus plans to stormwater, bike, and vacant land plans–it’s too much to keep up with.)

Worldwide, our urban expectations are growing by necessity. More than half of human beings live in cities, a proportion to grow to three-fourths by 2050, according to the Urban Age Project. That project, and others like it, are consumed by the act of reimagining cities as the generators of wealth, culture, and ideas–and as places to raise the human condition.

Today: two opportunities to take part in the discussion. Click HERE at 2:30PM to watch a live-streamed debate on the urban futures sponsored by the Ove Arup Foundation. In a similar vein, there are still spaces left for the 9PM screening tonight of “Urbanized,” a film with some of the Urban Age thinkers made by noted film-maker Gary Hustwit (“Helvetica”). The 6:30 screening will be followed by a discussion on the urban age in Philadelphia with Hustwit and planner Rick Redding. Our Ariel Diliberto will review the film in Vantage tomorrow.

This weekend: the past, present, and future of City Hall at Monumental! a symposium sponsored by the School of Design at Penn. Lauren Drapala will cover the symposium on the Daily.

Next week: TEDx Philly, on Tuesday, November 8, an all day action-focused city jam. Hidden City will be there with a booth and coverage by our newest writer, Julie Morcate.

About the author

Hidden City co-editor Nathaniel Popkin’s latest book is the novel Lion and Leopard (The Head and The Hand Press). He is also the author of Song of the City (Four Walls Eight Windows/Basic Books) and The Possible City (Camino Books). He is senior writer and script editor of the Emmy-winning documentary series “Philadelphia: The Great Experiment” and the fiction review editor of Cleaver Magazine. Popkin's literary criticism appears in the Wall Street Journal, Public Books, The Kenyon Review, and The Millions. He is writer-in-residence of the Athenaeum of Philadelphia.



Leave a Reply

Comment moderation is enabled, no need to resubmit any comments posted.

Recent Posts
The Gallery: Finally The Destination Ed Bacon Hoped For?

The Gallery: Finally The Destination Ed Bacon Hoped For?

March 23, 2017  |  Vantage

PREIT's transformation of The Gallery into an upscale shopping outlet promises to be the suburban-minded downtown destination that the first mall failed to deliver. Contributor Chris Giuliano takes a look at the redevelopment of East Market and Edmond Bacon's original plan. > more

New Life For An Old Coal Country Outpost In Society Hill

New Life For An Old Coal Country Outpost In Society Hill

March 20, 2017  |  The Shadow Knows

The Shadow takes a stroll down to Society Hill where business is stirring at an old 19th century coal company headquarters after 12 years of vacancy > more

New Exhibition Gives Movement To The Philadelphia School

New Exhibition Gives Movement To The Philadelphia School

March 17, 2017  |  Buzz

Two fans of Modernism re-evaluate architectural history with the exhibition, "What Was the Philadelphia School?" > more

Tracking The Evolution Of Industry At 34th And Grays Ferry

Tracking The Evolution Of Industry At 34th And Grays Ferry

March 16, 2017  |  Vantage

The site of Penn's new riverside research campus has a long, decorated history of industrial enterprise. Contributor Madeline Helmer dives deep into the backstory > more

Emergency Excavation In Old City Reveals Lack Of Oversight

Emergency Excavation In Old City Reveals Lack Of Oversight

March 15, 2017  |  News

The last-minute salvage excavation of First Baptist Church Burial Ground in Old City has the archaeological community up in arms. Is the City or the developer to blame? John Henry Scott reports > more

Ode To Old Philadelphia

Ode To Old Philadelphia

March 10, 2017  |  Buzz

Inspired by photographs from Hidden City's 2016 calendar, aging Philadelphians share their thoughts and memories of the city through poetry. Ann de Forest has the backstory > more